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Social Worker Jobs New York NY

Child, family, and school social workers provide social services and assistance to improve the social and psychological functioning of children and their families. Workers in this field assess their client's needs and offer assistance to improve their situation. This often includes coordinating available services to assist a child or family.

Justin Melia, CPRW
(877) 762-1290
1350 Avenue of the Americas, 4th Fl
New York, NY
 
Amy Phillip, CPRW
(718) 833-3254
446 73rd St.
Brooklyn, NY
 
Katherine Pappas, CPRW
(516) 627-2757
210 Manhasset Ave.
Manhasset, NY
 
Kaiser, Geoffrey R. - Kornstein Veisz Wexler & Pollard, LLP
(212) 418-8600
757 Third Avenue
New York, NY

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Leading Jobs Agency
(212) 683-5627
866 Ave Of The Americas Ste 2
New York, NY

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Shernette Linton, CPRW, CEIP
(347) 217-6375
452 West 149th St., #6-1
New York, NY
 
Kim Isaacs, CPRW, NCRW
(800) 203-0551
145 Clove Rd.
Staten Island, NY
 
M K Adams Assoc Inc
(212) 972-9339
370 Lexington Ave Ste 411
New York, NY

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Career Group
(212) 750-8188
1212 6TH Ave Ste 1703
New York, NY

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People Finders Plus
(212) 953-3772
295 Madison Ave
New York, NY

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Social Worker Jobs

Child, Family, and School Social Workers

Nature of the Work

Social work is a profession for those with a strong desire to help improve people's lives. Social workers assist people by helping them cope with and solve issues in their everyday lives, such as family and personal problems and dealing with relationships. Some social workers help clients who face a disability, life-threatening disease, social problem, such as inadequate housing, unemployment, or substance abuse. Social workers also assist families that have serious domestic conflicts, sometimes involving child or spousal abuse. Additionally, they may conduct research, advocate for improved services, or become involved in planning or policy development. Many social workers specialize in serving a particular population or working in a specific setting. In all settings, these workers may also be called licensed clinical social workers, if they hold the appropriate State mandated license.

Child, family, and school social workers provide social services and assistance to improve the social and psychological functioning of children and their families. Workers in this field assess their client's needs and offer assistance to improve their situation. This often includes coordinating available services to assist a child or family. They may assist single parents in finding day care, arrange adoptions, or help find foster homes for neglected, abandoned, or abused children. These workers may specialize in working with a particular problem, population or setting, such as child protective services, adoption, homelessness, domestic violence, or foster care.

In schools, social workers often serve as the link between students' families and the school, working with parents, guardians, teachers, and other school officials to ensure that students reach their academic and personal potential. They also assist students in dealing with stress or emotional problems. Many school social workers work directly with children with disabilities and their families. In addition, they address problems such as misbehavior, truancy, teenage pregnancy, and drug and alcohol problems and advise teachers on how to cope with difficult students. School social workers may teach workshops to entire classes on topics like conflict resolution.

Child, family, and school social workers may be known as child welfare social workers, family services social workers, or child protective services social workers. These workers often work for individual and family services agencies, schools, or State or local governments.

Medical and public health social workers provide psychosocial support to individuals, families, or vulnerable populations so they can cope with chronic, acute, or terminal illnesses, such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer, or AIDS. They also advise family caregivers, counsel patients, and help plan for patients' needs after discharge from hospitals. They may arrange for at-home services...

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