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Occupational Therapist Washington DC

Occupational therapists work in occupational therapy and help patients perform daily tasks and develop daily living and work skills. They also help client improve motor functions and improve decision-making, and assess clients’ activities and performance. See below for staffing agencies and job search companies in Washington, DC who can help you break into the healthcare industry as an occupational therapist.

NRI Staffing Resources
(202) 466-2160
1015 18th St NW Ste 710
Washington, DC
Type of Service
temporary, temporary/part time, part time

Metropolitan Staffing Associates, LLC
(703) 921-3860
1940 Duke St Ste 200
Alexandria, VA
Type of Service
temporary, long-term, temporary/part time, part time

Dynamix Corporation
(301) 513-0101
9111 Edmonston Rd Ste 100
Greenbelt, MD
Type of Service
temporary, long-term, temporary/part time, part time

Professional Services Network, Inc.
(877) 753-1776
13975 Connecticut Ave Ste 210
Silver Spring, MD
Type of Service
temporary, long-term, temporary/part time, part time

Absolute Staffers, LLC
(301) 498-0000
14502 Greenview Dr Ste 208
Laurel, MD
Type of Service
long-term

NEUVENTURE
(866) 218-2125
2 Wisconsin Circle
Chevy Chase , MD
Main Industries / Positions
Legal, Healthcare, Information Technology

Data Provided by:
Schwelling Recruiting Services
(703) 898-0401
4803 Erie St
College Park, MD
Main Industries / Positions
Healthcare, Sales, Marketing

Data Provided by:
iPlace USA
(310) 691-8537
8300 Boone Blvd
Vienna, VA
Main Industries / Positions
Information Technology, Finance, Healthcare

Data Provided by:
CMS Recruiting Consultants
(301) 538-5925
15903 Bishopstone Terrace
Upper Marlboro, MD
Main Industries / Positions
Information Technology, Healthcare, Finance

Data Provided by:
Faro Consultants International, LLC
(703) 281-1122
2740 Chain Bridge Rd
Vienna, VA
Main Industries / Positions
Healthcare, Legal, Executive

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Career Profile for Occupational Therapists - Education & Training - College Toolkit

Occupational Therapists

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Overview of Education & Training

Educational Attainment Breakdown for Occupational Therapists

Most Significant Source of Postsecondary Education or Training
Master's degree
Source: U.S. Department of Labor


In-Depth Look at Education & Training

Occupational therapists are regulated in all 50 States. Individuals pursuing a career as an occupational therapist usually need to earn a post-baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university or education deemed equivalent.

Education and training. A master's degree or higher in occupational therapy is the typical minimum requirement for entry into the field. In addition, occupational therapists must attend an academic program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) in order to sit for the national certifying exam. In 2009, 150 master's degree programs or combined bachelor's and master's degree programs were accredited, and 4 doctoral degree programs were accredited. Most schools have full-time programs, although a growing number are offering weekend or part-time programs as well. Coursework in occupational therapy programs include the physical, biological, and behavioral sciences as well as the application of occupational therapy theory and skills. All accredited programs require at least 24 weeks of supervised fieldwork as part of the academic curriculum.

People considering this profession should take high school courses in biology, chemistry, physics, health, art, and the social sciences. College admissions offices also look favorably on paid or volunteer experience in the healthcare field. Relevant undergraduate majors include biology, psychology, sociology, anthropology, liberal arts, and anatomy.

Licensure. All States regulate the practice of occupational therapy. To obtain a license, applicants must graduate from an accredited educational program and pass a national certification examination. Those who pass the exam are awarded the title "Occupational Therapist Registered (OTR)." Specific eligibility requirements for licensure vary by State; contact your State's licensing board for details.

Some ...

College or Higher 84.8%
Some College 14.9%
High School or Less .3%

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Career Profile for Occupational Therapists - Overview - College Toolkit

Occupational Therapists


Career Outlook

Employment is expected to grow much faster than average . Job opportunities should be good , especially for occupational therapists treating the elderly.

Employment change. Employment of occupational therapists is expected to increase by 26 percent between 2008 and 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. The increasing elderly population will drive growth in the demand for occupational therapy services. The demand for occupational therapists should continue to rise as a result of the increasing number of individuals with disabilities or limited function who require therapy services. Older persons have an increased incidence of heart attack and stroke, which will spur demand for therapeutic services. Growth in the population 75 years and older—an age group that suffers from high incidences of disabling conditions—also will increase demand for therapeutic services. In addition, medical advances now enable more patients with critical problems to survive—patients who ultimately may need extensive therapy. However, growth may be dampened by the impact of Federal legislation imposing limits on reimbursement for therapy services.

Hospitals will continue to employ a large number of occupational therapists to provide therapy services to acutely ill inpatients. Hospitals also will need occupational therapists to staff their outpatient rehabilitation programs.

Employment growth in schools will result from the expansion of the school-age population and the federally funded ...

Career Overview

Assess, plan, organize, and participate in rehabilitative programs that help restore vocational, homemaking, and daily living skills, as well as general independence, to disabled persons.

Salary for Occupational Therapists

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 25th
Percentile
75th
Percentile
Mean
U.S. $55,090
($26.49)
$81,290
($39.08)
$67,920
($32.65)
Annual figures are on top. Hourly figures are below in parentheses.
N/A = Information not available

Majors for this Career

  • Occupational Therapy/Therapist

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