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Middle School Special Education Teacher Jobs Washington DC

Special education teachers work with children and youths who have a variety of disabilities. A small number of special education teachers work with students with severe cognitive, emotional, or physical disabilities, primarily teaching them life skills and basic literacy.

4Staff, LLC
(202) 347-1044
1001 G St NW Ste 425W
Washington, DC
Type of Service
temporary, temporary/part time, part time

Tangent
(202) 331-9484
1901 L St Nw # 705
Washington, DC

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The Midtown Group Inc. dba Midtown Personnel Inc.
(202) 887-4747
900 7th St NW Ste 725
Washington, DC
Type of Service
temporary, long-term, temporary/part time, part time, payroll

Legalsource
(202) 529-8367
1319 F Street NW
Washington, DC

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The Affiliates
(202) 626-0120
1201 F St Nw
Washington, DC

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Doug Munro
(202) 962-0595
707 H Street Northwest
Washington, DC

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Unique International
(202) 887-0777
1625 K St Nw # 900
Washington, DC

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Hire Knowledge
(202) 347-7890
514 10 St
Washington D.C., DC

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Enlightened, Inc.
(202) 783-4655
666 11th Street NW
Washington, DC
Main Industries / Positions
Information Technology

Data Provided by:
Eds
(202) 414-4700
800 K Street Northwest
Washington, DC

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Middle School Special Education Teacher Jobs

Special Education Teachers, Middle School

Nature of the Work

Special education teachers work with children and youths who have a variety of disabilities. A small number of special education teachers work with students with severe cognitive, emotional, or physical disabilities, primarily teaching them life skills and basic literacy. However, the majority of special education teachers work with children with mild to moderate disabilities, using or modifying the general education curriculum to meet the child's individual needs and providing required remedial instruction. Most special education teachers instruct students at the preschool, elementary, middle, and secondary school level, although some work with infants and toddlers.

The various types of disabilities that may qualify individuals for special education programs are as follows: specific learning disabilities, speech or language impairments, mental retardation, emotional disturbance, multiple disabilities, hearing impairments, orthopedic impairments, visual impairments, autism, combined deafness and blindness, traumatic brain injury, and other health impairments. Students are identified under one or more of these categories. Early identification of a child with special needs is an important part of a special education teacher's job, because early intervention is essential in educating children with disabilities.

Special education teachers use various techniques to promote learning. Depending on the student, teaching methods can include intensive individualized instruction, problem-solving assignments, and small-group work. When students need special accommodations to learn the general curriculum or to take a test, special education teachers ensure that appropriate accommodations are provided, such as having material read orally or lengthening the time allowed to take the test.

Special education teachers help to develop an Individualized Education Program (IEP) for each student receiving special education. The IEP sets personalized goals for the student and is tailored to that student's individual needs and abilities. When appropriate, the program includes a transition plan outlining specific steps to prepare students for middle school or high school or, in the case of older students, a job or postsecondary study. Teachers review the IEP with the student's parents, school administrators, and the student's general education teachers. Teachers work closely with parents to inform them of their children's progress and suggest techniques to promote learning outside of school.

Special education teachers design and teach appropriate curricula, assign work geared toward each student's needs and abilities, and grade papers and homework assignments. They are involved in the student's behavioral, social, and academic development, helping them develop emotionally and interact effectively in social situations. Preparing special education students for daily life after gradu...

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