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Locomotive Engineer Jobs Washington DC

Rail transportation workers are employed by three types of railroads: freight, passenger, and urban transit (subway and light rail). Freight railroads transport billions of tons of goods to destinations within the United States and to ports to be shipped abroad. Passenger railroads deliver millions of passengers and long-distance commuters to destinations throughout the country.

Bettie Biehn, CPRW
(703) 836-8417
414 E. Custis Ave.
Alexandria, VA
 
Shirley Bliss,CPRW, CEIP, CPCC
(301) 919-9907
3310 N. Leisure World Blvd., #803
Silver Spring, MD
 
A F G E Local 1092
(202) 561-2700
Bolling Afb
Washington, DC
 
Spencer Stuart
(202) 756-3793
1101 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC

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United States Veterans Assistance Center (USVAC) Veterans Affairs Regional Office
(202) 530-9371
1722 I Street, N.W., 3rd Floor, Suite 303
Washington, DC
 
Darren Cox, CPRW, CPCC
(202) 641-0879
9311 Fordsville Court
Clinton, MD
 
Avery Webster, CPRW
(301) 254-6173
PO Box 6440
Largo, MD
 
Drive recovery software
001-9800000000
Street
Town, NM
 
Spencer Stuart Washington
(202) 638-8732
1455 Pennsylvania Ave Nw # 200
Washington, DC

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Keepers
(202) 223-4855
2000 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC

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Locomotive Engineer Jobs

Locomotive Engineers

Nature of the Work

Rail transportation workers are employed by three types of railroads: freight, passenger, and urban transit (subway and light rail). Freight railroads transport billions of tons of goods to destinations within the United States and to ports to be shipped abroad. Passenger railroads deliver millions of passengers and long-distance commuters to destinations throughout the country. Subways and light-rail systems move passengers within metropolitan areas and their surrounding suburbs. All of these modes of rail transportation require employees to operate, oversee, and assist in rail operations. Rail transportation workers not only work on trains, but also can be found working in rail yards where railcars are inspected, repaired, coupled, and uncoupled.

Locomotive engineers operate large trains carrying cargo or passengers between stations. Most engineers run diesel-electric locomotives, although a few operate locomotives powered by battery or externally supplied electricity. Before each run, engineers check the mechanical condition of their locomotives, making any necessary minor adjustments and documenting issues that require more thorough inspection. While trains are in motion, engineers move controls such as throttles and airbrakes. They also monitor instruments that measure speed, amperage, battery charge, and air pressure, both in the brake lines and in the main reservoir. Engineers must have thorough knowledge of their routes and must be constantly aware of the condition and makeup of their train, because trains react differently to the grade and condition of the rail, the number of cars, the ratio of empty cars to loaded cars, and the amount of slack in the train.

Railroad conductors coordinate all activities of freight or passenger train crews. Conductors assigned to freight trains review schedules, switching orders, waybills, and shipping records to obtain loading and unloading information regarding their cargo. In addition, they are responsible for the distribution of tonnage in the train and the operation of freight cars within rail yards and terminals that use remote control locomotive technology. Conductors assigned to passenger trains also ensure passenger safety and comfort as they go about collecting tickets and fares, making announcements for the benefit of passengers, and coordinating the activities of the crew.

Before trains leave a terminal, the conductor and the engineer discuss any concerns regarding the train's route, timetable, and cargo. During runs and in rail yards, engineers and conductors interface with traffic-control-center personnel, dispatchers, and personnel on other trains to issue or receive information concerning stops, delays, and the locations of trains. While engineers interpret and comply with orders, signals, speed limits, and railroad rules and regulations, conductors use dispatch or electronic monitoring devices to relay information a...

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