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Interior Design Jobs Washington DC

Interior designers draw upon many disciplines to enhance the function, safety, and aesthetics of interior spaces. Their main concerns are with how different colors, textures, furniture, lighting, and space work together to meet the needs of a building's occupants. Designers plan interior spaces of almost every type of building, including offices, airport terminals, theaters, shopping malls, restaurants, hotels, schools, hospitals, and private residences.

Bettie Biehn, CPRW
(703) 836-8417
414 E. Custis Ave.
Alexandria, VA
 
Shirley Bliss,CPRW, CEIP, CPCC
(301) 919-9907
3310 N. Leisure World Blvd., #803
Silver Spring, MD
 
Spencer Stuart Washington
(202) 638-8732
1455 Pennsylvania Ave Nw # 200
Washington, DC

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001-9800000000
Street
Town, NM
 
United States Veterans Assistance Center (USVAC) Veterans Affairs Regional Office
(202) 530-9371
1722 I Street, N.W., 3rd Floor, Suite 303
Washington, DC
 
Darren Cox, CPRW, CPCC
(202) 641-0879
9311 Fordsville Court
Clinton, MD
 
Avery Webster, CPRW
(301) 254-6173
PO Box 6440
Largo, MD
 
A F G E Local 1092
(202) 561-2700
Bolling Afb
Washington, DC
 
Spencer Stuart
(202) 756-3793
1101 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC

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Randstad
(202) 833-2660
1025 Connecticut Ave NW Ste 717
Washington, DC

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Interior Design Career

Interior Designers

Nature of the Work

Interior designers draw upon many disciplines to enhance the function, safety, and aesthetics of interior spaces. Their main concerns are with how different colors, textures, furniture, lighting, and space work together to meet the needs of a building's occupants. Designers plan interior spaces of almost every type of building, including offices, airport terminals, theaters, shopping malls, restaurants, hotels, schools, hospitals, and private residences. Good design can boost office productivity, increase sales, attract a more affluent clientele, provide a more relaxing hospital stay, or increase a building's market value.

Traditionally, most interior designers focused on decorating—choosing a style and color palette and then selecting appropriate furniture, floor and window coverings, artwork, and lighting. However, an increasing number of designers are becoming involved in architectural detailing, such as crown molding and built-in bookshelves, and in planning layouts of buildings undergoing renovation, including helping to determine the location of windows, stairways, escalators, and walkways.

Interior designers must be able to read blueprints, understand building and fire codes, and know how to make space accessible to people who are disabled. Designers frequently collaborate with architects, electricians, and building contractors to ensure that designs are safe and meet construction requirements.

Whatever space they are working on, almost all designers follow the same process. The first step, known as programming, is to determine the client's needs and wishes. The designer usually meets face-to-face with the client to find out how the space will be used and to get an idea of the client's preferences and budget. For example, the designer might inquire about a family's cooking habits if the family is remodeling a kitchen or ask about a store or restaurant's target customer to pick an appropriate motif. The designer also will visit the space to take inventory of existing furniture and equipment and identify positive attributes of the space and potential problems.

After collecting this information, the designer formulates a design plan and estimates costs. Today, designs often are created with the use of computer-aided design (CAD) software, which provides more detail and easier corrections than sketches made by hand. Upon completing the design plan, the designer will present it to the client and make revisions based on the client's input.

When the design concept is finalized, the designer will begin specifying the materials, finishes, and furnishings required, such as furniture, lighting, flooring, wall covering, and artwork. Depending on the complexity of the project, the designer also might submit drawings for approval by a construction inspector to ensure that the design meets building codes. If a project requires structural work, the designer wor...

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