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Human Resources Manager Jobs Aberdeen SD

There are many types of human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists. In a small organization, a human resources generalist may handle all aspects of human resources work, and thus require an extensive range of knowledge. The responsibilities of human resources generalists can vary widely, depending on their employer's needs.

Aberdeen Area Career Planning Center
(605) 626-2298
420 S Roosevelt St
Aberdeen, SD
 
Cornerstones Career Learning Center -Aberdeen Office
(605) 626-2298
420 South Roosevelt
Aberdeen, SD
 
South Dakota Career Center
(605) 626-2340
420 S Roosevelt St
Aberdeen, SD
 
Career Advantage
(605) 696-5264
910 4th St Ste H
Brookings, SD
 
Avera Healthworks
(605) 322-5100
4928 N Cliff Ave
Sioux Falls, SD
 
Machinist Union Dist Lodge 5
(605) 226-1263
617 S 15th St
Aberdeen, SD
 
Employment Usa
(605) 226-2116
714 S Main St Ste 1
Aberdeen, SD
 
South Dakota Department Of Labor - Aberdeen Local Office
(605) 626-2340
420 South Roosevelt St.
Aberdeen, SD
 
South Dakota Department Of Labor - Winner Local Office
(605) 842-0474
313 South Main Street
Winner, SD
 
Machinist Union Dist Lodge 5
(605) 226-1263
617 S 15th St
Aberdeen, SD
 

Human Resources Manager Jobs

Human Resources Managers, All Other

Nature of the Work

Every organization wants to attract, motivate, and retain the most qualified employees and match them to jobs for which they are best suited. Human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists provide this connection. In the past, these workers performed the administrative function of an organization, such as handling employee benefits questions or recruiting, interviewing, and hiring new staff in accordance with policies established by top management. Today's human resources workers manage these tasks, but, increasingly, they consult with top executives regarding strategic planning. They have moved from behind-the-scenes staff work to leading the company in suggesting and changing policies.

In an effort to enhance morale and productivity, limit job turnover, and help organizations increase performance and improve results, these workers also help their companies effectively use employee skills, provide training and development opportunities to improve those skills, and increase employees' satisfaction with their jobs and working conditions. Although some jobs in the human resources field require only limited contact with people outside the human resources office, dealing with people is an important part of the job.

There are many types of human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists. In a small organization, a human resources generalist may handle all aspects of human resources work, and thus require an extensive range of knowledge. The responsibilities of human resources generalists can vary widely, depending on their employer's needs.

In a large corporation, the director of human resources may supervise several departments, each headed by an experienced manager who most likely specializes in one human resources activity, such as employment and placement, compensation and benefits, training and development, or labor relations. The director may report to a top human resources executive.

Employment and placement. Employment and placement managers supervise the recruitment, hiring, and separation of employees. They also supervise employment, recruitment, and placement specialists, including employment interviewers. Employment, recruitment, and placement specialists recruit and place workers.

Recruitment specialists maintain contacts within the community and may travel considerably, often to job fairs and college campuses, to search for promising job applicants. Recruiters screen, interview, and occasionally test applicants. They also may check references and extend job offers. These workers must be thoroughly familiar with their organization, the work that is done, and the human resources policies of their company in order to discuss wages, working conditions and advancement opportunities with prospective employees. They also must stay informed about equal employment opportunity (EEO) and affirmative actio...

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