Home Scholarships Colleges Careers Articles Calculators Student Loans

Flight Attendant Jobs Aberdeen SD

Major airlines are required by law to provide flight attendants for the safety and security of the traveling public. Although the primary job of the flight attendants is to ensure that security and safety regulations are followed, attendants also try to make flights comfortable and enjoyable for passengers.

Midwest Recruiters
(605) 647-5447
1018 S Garfield St
Lennox, SD

Data Provided by:
Erstaff
(605) 432-6621
233 E 2 Ave
Milbank, SD

Data Provided by:
Regency Consulting
(605) 232-3205
PO Box 77
North Sioux City, SD

Data Provided by:
Employment Edge/Pinnacle Business Services
(605) 271-5627
4320 S Louise Ave Ste 105
Sioux Falls, SD
Type of Service
temporary, long-term, temporary/part time, part time, payroll

Westaff
(605) 343-4775
1107 Mount Rushmore Rd
Rapid City, SD

Data Provided by:
Availability Employment Services
(605) 336-0353
4309 S Racket Drive
Sioux Falls, SD
Main Industries / Positions
Executive, Human Resources, Admin & Clerical

Data Provided by:
Availabilty Employment
\t 605-336-0353
4309 S Racket Drive
Sioux Falls, SD

Data Provided by:
Advance Services
(605) 665-0500
1800 Broadway St
Yankton, SD

Data Provided by:
Employment Edge
(330) 494-9243
4320 S Louise Ave
Sioux Falls, SD

Data Provided by:
Career Connections
(310) 516-9980
1130 S Burr St
Mitchell, SD

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Flight Attendant Jobs

Nature of the Work

Major airlines are required by law to provide flight attendants for the safety and security of the traveling public. Although the primary job of the flight attendants is to ensure that security and safety regulations are followed, attendants also try to make flights comfortable and enjoyable for passengers.

At least 1 hour before takeoff, attendants are briefed by the captain—the pilot in command—on such things as emergency evacuation procedures, coordination of the crew, the length of the flight, expected weather conditions, and any special issues having to do with passengers. Flight attendants make sure that first-aid kits and other emergency equipment are aboard and in working order and that the passenger cabin is in order, with adequate supplies of food, beverages, and any other amenities. As passengers board the plane, flight attendants greet them, check their tickets, and tell them where to store carry-on items.

Before the plane takes off, flight attendants instruct all passengers in the use of emergency equipment and check to see that seatbelts are fastened, seat backs are in upright positions, and all carry-on items are properly stowed. In the air, helping passengers in the event of an emergency is the most important responsibility of a flight attendant. Safety-related actions range from reassuring passengers during rough weather to directing passengers who must evacuate a plane following an emergency landing. Flight attendants also answer questions about the flight, and help small children, elderly or disabled persons, and any others needing assistance. Flight attendants may administer first aid to passengers who become ill. Flight attendants generally serve beverages and on many flights sell precooked meals or snacks. Prior to landing, flight attendants take inventory of headsets, alcoholic beverages, and moneys collected. They also report any medical problems passengers may have had, the condition of cabin equipment, and any lost-and-found articles.

Lead, or first, flight attendants, sometimes known as pursers, oversee the work of the other attendants aboard the aircraft, while performing most of the same duties.

Work environment. Because airlines operate around the clock and year round, flight attendants can work nights, holidays, and weekends. In most cases, agreements between the airline and the employees' union determine the total daily and monthly working time. Scheduled on-duty time usually is limited to 12 hours per day, however flight attendants can be scheduled up to 14 hours per day, with somewhat greater maximums for international flying. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires that flight attendants receive 9 consecutive hours of rest following any duty period.

Attendants usually fly 65 to 90 hours a month and generally spend another 50 hours a month on the ground preparing planes for flights, writing reports following completed ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from College Toolkit