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Coil Winder, Taper, and Finisher Jobs Concord NH

The job of an assembler or fabricator ranges from very easy to very complicated, requiring a range of knowledge and skills. Skilled assemblers putting together complex machines, for example, begin by reading detailed schematics or blueprints that show how to assemble the machine. After determining how parts should connect, they use hand or power tools to trim, shim, cut, and make other adjustments to fit components together and align properly. Once the parts are properly aligned, they connect them with bolts and screws or by welding or soldering pieces together.

NH WORKS Concord
(603) 228-4100
10 West Street
Concord, NH
 
Concord Local 1045 Firefighters
(603) 224-3020
100 Hall St Ste 101
Concord, NH
 
NH WORKS Manchester
(603) 656-6557
300 Hanover Street
Manchester, NH
 
Working Future
(603) 622-5935
200 Elm St Ste 10
Manchester, NH
 
American Federation Of State County & Municipal Employees
(603) 606-3303
195 Mcgregor St
Manchester, NH
 
International Brotherhood Of Electrical Workers
(603) 224-4239
48 Airport Rd
Concord, NH
 
Contractors Risk Management Inc
(603) 225-3335
33 Fisherville Rd
Concord, NH
 
American Postal Workers Union
(603) 669-2414
450 Hanover St
Manchester, NH
 
New Eng Teamsters & Baking Industry Health Benefits
(978) 681-0852
51 Goffstown Rd Ste 1
Manchester, NH
 
New England Farm Workers Council
(603) 647-6833
50 Bridge St Ste 103
Manchester, NH
 

Coil Winder, Taper, and Finisher Jobs

Coil Winders, Tapers, and Finishers

Nature of the Work

Assemblers and fabricators play an important role in the manufacturing process. They assemble both finished products and the pieces that go into them. The products they assemble using tools, machines, and their hands range from entire airplanes to children's toys. They fabricate and assemble household appliances, automobiles, computers, electronic devices, and more.

Changes in technology have transformed the manufacturing and assembly process. Modern manufacturing systems use robots, computers, programmable motion control devices, and various sensing technologies. These systems change the way in which goods are made and affect the jobs of those who make them. The more advanced assemblers must be able to work with these new technologies and use them to produce goods.

The job of an assembler or fabricator ranges from very easy to very complicated, requiring a range of knowledge and skills. Skilled assemblers putting together complex machines, for example, begin by reading detailed schematics or blueprints that show how to assemble the machine. After determining how parts should connect, they use hand or power tools to trim, shim, cut, and make other adjustments to fit components together and align properly. Once the parts are properly aligned, they connect them with bolts and screws or by welding or soldering pieces together.

Careful quality control is important throughout the assembly process, so assemblers look for faulty components and mistakes in the assembly process. They help to fix problems before more defective products are produced.

Manufacturing techniques are evolving away from traditional assembly line systems toward "lean" manufacturing systems, which are causing the nature of assemblers' work to change. Lean manufacturing uses teams of workers to produce entire products or components. Team assemblers may still work on an assembly line, but they rotate through different tasks, rather than specializing in a single task. The team also may decide how the work is assigned and how different tasks are performed. This worker flexibility helps companies cover for absent workers, improves productivity, and increases companies' ability to respond to changes in demand by shifting labor from one product line to another. For example, if demand for a product drops, companies may reduce the total number of workers producing it, asking the remaining workers to perform more stages of the assembly process. Some aspects of lean production, such as rotating tasks and seeking worker input on improving the assembly process, are common to all assembly and fabrication occupations.

Although most assemblers and fabricators are classified as team assemblers, others specialize in producing one type of product or perform the same or similar tasks throughout the assembly process. These workers are classified according to the products they assemble or produce. Electrical and el...

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