Home Scholarships Colleges Careers Articles Calculators Student Loans

Business Teacher Jobs Bismarck ND

Most postsecondary teachers use computer technology extensively, including the Internet, e-mail, and software programs. They may use computers in the classroom as teaching aids and may post course content, class notes, class schedules, and other information on the Internet. The use of e-mail, instant messages, and other computer utilities has improved communications greatly between students and teachers.

Ibew Local 714
(701) 258-6370
1800 Commerce St
Bismarck, ND
 
Cwa
(701) 258-8222
418 E Rosser Ave Ste B
Bismarck, ND
 
Laborer'S Unionlocal 563
(701) 223-5991
1323 E Front Ave Ste 2
Bismarck, ND
 
Carpenter'S Union Local 1091
(701) 255-3700
217 S Mandan St
Bismarck, ND
 
Job Service North Dakota
(800) 247-0981
1601 East Century Avenue
Bismarck, ND
 
I B E W System Council U13
(701) 222-2514
1800 Commerce St
Bismarck, ND
 
Boilermakers Lodge 647
(701) 663-2384
1323 E Front Ave
Bismarck, ND
 
Missouri Slope Central Labor Council
(701) 224-9503
1323 E Front Ave
Bismarck, ND
 
North Dakota Safety Council Inc
(701) 223-6372
1640 Burnt Boat Drive
Bismarck, ND
 
Western Drilling Inc
(701) 471-7890
3566 110th Ave NE
Bismarck, ND
 

Business Teacher Jobs

Business Teachers, Postsecondary

Nature of the Work

Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a wide variety of academic and vocational subjects beyond the high school level. Most of these students are working toward a degree, but many others are studying for a certificate or certification to improve their knowledge or career skills. Postsecondary teachers include college and university faculty, postsecondary career and technical education teachers, and graduate teaching assistants. Teaching in any venue involves forming a lesson plan, presenting material to students, responding to students learning needs, and evaluating students' progress. In addition to teaching, postsecondary teachers, particularly those at 4-year colleges and universities, perform a significant amount of research in the subject they teach. They also must keep up with new developments in their field and may consult with government, business, nonprofit, and community organizations.

College and university faculty make up the majority of postsecondary teachers. Faculty usually are organized into departments or divisions based on academic subject or field. They typically teach several related courses in their subject—algebra, calculus, and statistics, for example. They may instruct undergraduate or graduate students or both. College and university faculty may give lectures to several hundred students in large halls, lead small seminars, or supervise students in laboratories. They prepare lectures, exercises, and laboratory experiments; grade exams and papers; and advise and work with students individually. In universities, they also supervise graduate students' teaching and research. College faculty work with an increasingly varied student population made up of growing shares of part-time, older, and culturally and racially diverse students.

Faculty keep up with developments in their field by reading current literature, talking with colleagues, and participating in professional conferences. They also are encouraged to do their own research to expand knowledge in their field by performing experiments, collecting and analyzing data, or examining original documents, literature, and other source material. They publish their findings in scholarly journals, books, and electronic media.

Most postsecondary teachers use computer technology extensively, including the Internet, e-mail, and software programs. They may use computers in the classroom as teaching aids and may post course content, class notes, class schedules, and other information on the Internet. The use of e-mail, instant messages, and other computer utilities has improved communications greatly between students and teachers.

Some instructors use the Internet to teach courses to students at remote sites. These distance-learning courses are becoming an increasingly popular option for students who work while attending school. Faculty who teach these courses must be able to adapt existing ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from College Toolkit