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Athletic Trainer Jobs Washington DC

Athletic trainers help prevent and treat injuries for people of all ages. Their patients and clients include everyone from professional athletes to industrial workers. Recognized by the American Medical Association as allied health professionals, athletic trainers specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation of their patients or clients.

Simply Fit
(202) 667-6759
1539 7th St Nw
Washington, DC
 
Fitness Techniques Llc
(202) 484-3061
300 M St Nw
Washington, DC
 
Rich Bodies Gym
(202) 298-7867
1000 Potomac St Nw
Washington, DC
 
Active Duty Fitness
(202) 452-1861
1750 K St Nw
Washington, DC
 
Evolution Personal Training Center
(202) 347-2250
1224 M St NWWashington
, DC
 
Whelan Strength Training
(202) 638-1708
800 7th St Nw
Washington, DC
 
Columbia Square Fitness Center
(202) 383-8778
555 13th St NW
Washington, DC
 
Washington Snap Fitness
1111 Congress St.
Washington, DC
Programs & Services
Circuit Training, Elliptical Trainers, Free Weights, Personal Training, Pilates, Stair Climber, Stationary Bikes, Towel Service, Treadmill, Weight Machines

Data Provided by:
Pure Joe Studios
(202) 737-7776
1221 Massachusetts Ave Nw
Washington, DC
 
Fitness Together Scott Circle
(202) 861-2222
1112 16th Street NW
Washington, DC
Programs & Services
Elliptical Trainers, Free Weights, Personal Training, Treadmill, Weight Machines

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Athletic Trainer Career

Athletic Trainers

Nature of the Work

Athletic trainers help prevent and treat injuries for people of all ages. Their patients and clients include everyone from professional athletes to industrial workers. Recognized by the American Medical Association as allied health professionals, athletic trainers specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation of muscle and bone injuries and illnesses. Athletic trainers, as one of the first healthcare providers on the scene when injuries occur, must be able to recognize, evaluate, and assess injuries and provide immediate care when needed. Athletic trainers should not be confused with fitness trainers or personal trainers, who are not healthcare workers, but rather train people to become physically fit.

Athletic trainers try to prevent injuries by educating people on how to reduce their risk for injuries and by advising them on the proper use of equipment, exercises to improve balance and strength, and home exercises and therapy programs. They also help apply protective or injury-preventive devices such as tape, bandages, and braces.

Athletic trainers may work under the direction of a licensed physician, and in cooperation with other healthcare providers. The extent of the direction ranges from discussing specific injuries and treatment options with a physician to performing evaluations and treatments as directed by a physician. Some athletic trainers meet with the team physician or consulting physician once or twice a week; others interact with a physician every day. Athletic trainers often have administrative responsibilities. These may include regular meetings with an athletic director, physician practice manager, or other administrative officer to deal with budgets, purchasing, policy implementation, and other business-related issues.

Work environment. The industry and individual employer are significant in determining the work environment of athletic trainers. Many athletic trainers work indoors most of the time; others, especially those in some sports-related jobs, spend much of their time working outdoors. The job also might require standing for long periods, working with medical equipment or machinery, and being able to walk, run, kneel, stoop, or crawl. Travel may be required.

Schedules vary by work setting. Athletic trainers in nonsports settings generally have an established schedule—usually about 40 to 50 hours per week—with nights and weekends off. Athletic trainers working in hospitals and clinics may spend part of their time working at other locations doing outreach services. The most common outreach programs include conducting athletic training services and speaking at high schools, colleges, and commercial businesses.

Athletic trainers in sports settings have schedules that are longer and more variable. These athletic trainers must be present for team practices and competitions, which often are on evenings.

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