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Anesthesiologists Washington DC

Anesthesiologists focus on the care of surgical patients and pain relief. Like other physicians, they evaluate and treat patients and direct the efforts of their staffs. Through continual monitoring and assessment, these critical care specialists are responsible for maintenance of the patient's vital life functions—heart rate, body temperature, blood pressure, breathing—during surgery.

Bettie Biehn, CPRW
(703) 836-8417
414 E. Custis Ave.
Alexandria, VA
 
Shirley Bliss,CPRW, CEIP, CPCC
(301) 919-9907
3310 N. Leisure World Blvd., #803
Silver Spring, MD
 
Spencer Stuart Washington
(202) 638-8732
1455 Pennsylvania Ave Nw # 200
Washington, DC

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Spencer Stuart
(202) 756-3793
1101 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC

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Office of Youth Programs/Passport to Work Program
(202) 698-5202
625 H Street, N.E., 1st Floor
Washington, DC
 
Darren Cox, CPRW, CPCC
(202) 641-0879
9311 Fordsville Court
Clinton, MD
 
Avery Webster, CPRW
(301) 254-6173
PO Box 6440
Largo, MD
 
A F G E Local 1092
(202) 561-2700
Bolling Afb
Washington, DC
 
Drive recovery software
001-9800000000
Street
Town, NM
 
Randstad
(202) 393-2388
233 Massachusetts Ave NE
Washington, DC

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Anesthesiologist Career

Anesthesiologists

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Nature of the Work

Physicians and surgeons diagnose illnesses and prescribe and administer treatment for people suffering from injury or disease. Physicians examine patients, obtain medical histories, and order, perform, and interpret diagnostic tests. They counsel patients on diet, hygiene, and preventive healthcare.

There are two types of physicians: M.D. (Medical Doctor) and D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine). M.D.s also are known as allopathic physicians. While both M.D.s and D.O.s may use all accepted methods of treatment, including drugs and surgery, D.O.s place special emphasis on the body's musculoskeletal system, preventive medicine, and holistic patient care. D.O.s are most likely to be primary care specialists although they can be found in all specialties. About half of D.O.s practice general or family medicine, general internal medicine, or general pediatrics.

Physicians work in one or more of several specialties, including, but not limited to, anesthesiology, family and general medicine, general internal medicine, general pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and surgery.

Anesthesiologists focus on the care of surgical patients and pain relief. Like other physicians, they evaluate and treat patients and direct the efforts of their staffs. Through continual monitoring and assessment, these critical care specialists are responsible for maintenance of the patient's vital life functions—heart rate, body temperature, blood pressure, breathing—during surgery. They also work outside of the operating room, providing pain relief in the intensive care unit, during labor and delivery, and for those who suffer from chronic pain. Anesthesiologists confer with other physicians and surgeons about appropriate treatments and procedures before, during, and after operations.

Family and general physicians often provide the first point of contact for people seeking healthcare, by acting as the traditional family physician. They assess and treat a wide range of conditions, from sinus and respiratory infections to broken bones. Family and general physician typically have a base of regular, long-term patients. These doctors refer patients with more serious conditions to specialists or other healthcare facilities for more intensive care.

General internists diagnose and provide nonsurgical treatment for a ...

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