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Aircraft Mechanic and Service Technician Jobs Boulder City NV

Aircraft mechanics inspect aircraft engines, landing gear, instruments, pressurized sections, accessories—brakes, valves, pumps, and air-conditioning systems, for example—and other parts of the aircraft, and do the necessary maintenance and replacement of parts.

I T T Technical Institute
(702) 558-5404
168 N Gibson Rd
Henderson, NV
 
PIMA Medical Institute
(702) 458-9650
3333 E Flamingo Rd
Las Vegas, NV
 
Reno Tahoe Job Training Academy
(775) 329-5665
3702 S Virginia St
Reno, NV
 
Abaris Training Resources
(775) 827-6568
5401 Longley Ln
Reno, NV
 
I T T Technical Institute
(702) 558-5404
168 N Gibson Rd
Henderson, NV
 
Crescent School of Gaming & Bartending
(702) 458-9910
4180 S Sandhill Rd Ste B 8
Las Vegas, NV
 
ITT Technical Institute
(702) 240-0967
2445 Fire Mesa St Ste 200
Las Vegas, NV
 
Academy of Professional Cocktail Services & Bartenders
(702) 878-1664
5734 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
 
Aba Training Center
(775) 843-2152
137 Vassar St
Reno, NV
 
Training Culinary Academy The
(702) 924-2100
710 W Lake Mead Blvd
North Las Vegas, NV
 

Aircraft Mechanic and Service Technician Jobs

Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians

Nature of the Work

Today's airplanes are highly complex machines with parts that must function within extreme tolerances for them to operate safely. To keep aircraft in peak operating condition, aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and service technicians perform scheduled maintenance, make repairs, and complete inspections required by the FAA.

Many aircraft mechanics specialize in preventive maintenance. They inspect aircraft engines, landing gear, instruments, pressurized sections, accessories—brakes, valves, pumps, and air-conditioning systems, for example—and other parts of the aircraft, and do the necessary maintenance and replacement of parts. They also keep records related to the maintenance performed on the aircraft. Mechanics and technicians conduct inspections following a schedule based on the number of hours the aircraft has flown, calendar days since the last inspection, cycles of operation, or a combination of these factors. In large, sophisticated planes equipped with aircraft monitoring systems, mechanics can gather valuable diagnostic information from electronic boxes and consoles that monitor the aircraft's basic operations. In planes of all sorts, aircraft mechanics examine engines by working through specially designed openings while standing on ladders or scaffolds or by using hoists or lifts to remove the entire engine from the craft. After taking an engine apart, mechanics use precision instruments to measure parts for wear and use x-ray and magnetic inspection equipment to check for invisible cracks. They repair or replace worn or defective parts. Mechanics also may repair sheet metal or composite surfaces; measure the tension of control cables; and check for corrosion, distortion, and cracks in the fuselage, wings, and tail. After completing all repairs, they must test the equipment to ensure that it works properly.

Other mechanics specialize in repair work rather than inspection. They find and fix problems that pilot's describe. For example, during a preflight check, a pilot may discover that the aircraft's fuel gauge does not work. To solve the problem, mechanics may troubleshoot the electrical system, using electrical test equipment to make sure that no wires are broken or shorted out, and replace any defective electrical or electronic components. Mechanics work as fast as safety permits so that the aircraft can be put back into service quickly.

Some mechanics work on one or many different types of aircraft, such as jets, propeller-driven airplanes, and helicopters. Others specialize in one section of a particular type of aircraft, such as the engine, hydraulics, or electrical system. In small, independent repair shops, mechanics usually inspect and repair many different types of aircraft.

Airframe mechanics are authorized to work on any part of the aircraft except the instruments, power plants, and propellers...

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